EXSC 662 - Mechanical Analysis of Activity
Brigham Young University
These projects will be due one week after the assigned date

 

#1: Projectile Motion (work alone on this project)

This project is designed to help you learn to derive characteristics of projectiles to determine the trajectory a projectile will follow

  • Look at the projectile motion equations from the Online Book.
  • Write out the derivation of maximum height, horizontal displacement, and flight time (the long and short equations).
    • These will be shown in class
  • Use the golf ball simulator to see what the optimal velocity is to get the ball in the cup for the following situations:
    • Angle of 20 deg with a range from 1.204 kg/m3 to 0.77 kg/m3
    • Angle of 20 deg and wind from -8 to +8 m/s
  • Answer the following questions:
    • What happens to the optimal velocity as air density is decreased (Be descriptive, is the slope linear)?
    • What happens to the optimal velocity as wind goes from -8 to +8 m/s (Be descriptive, is the slope linear)?
    • What happens to the optimal angle when going for maximum distance when using a velocity of 70 m/s as air dentisty goes down and gravity goes up (try air density of 1.0 kg/m3 and g = -9.797 m/s2 when compared with a starting air density of 1.2 kg/m3 and g = -9.806 m/s2)?

Turn in your derivations of the characteristics of projectile equations (probably handwritten). Turn in your responses to the questions related to the golf ball simulator (preferably typed).


#2: Velocity & Acceleration (work with one partner on this project)

This project is designed to help you learn to calculate velocity and acceleration from position and time data.

  • Save the horizontal and vertical position data from the ball we will drop in class and track with the Vicon system
  • Bring the horizontal and vertical position data into a spreadsheet.
  • Calculate the velocity and acceleration horizontally and vertically and create graphs of each (six graphs total).
  • Answer the following questions
    • What is the vertical velocity of the ball at the highest point of the flight?
    • In theory, what should the horizontal acceleration of the ball be?
    • In theory, what should the vertical acceleration of the ball be?
    • Explain the discrepancies between the measured and theoretical accelerations.

Turn in the spreadsheet and responses to the questions with you and your partners name on it (one copy for the pair of you is all that is needed).


#3: Angular Kinematics (work with one partner on this project)

You will learn in this project how angular momentum, angular velocity, and linear velocity all relate to each other in a tetherball game.

  • We will measure the position of a ball attached to a string attached to a post as it spins around. The string will wrap around the pole leading to a shortening radius.
  • You will have a spreadsheet showing the radius and the position.
  • Calculate the angular inertia, angular momentum, and angular and linear velocities.
  • Create graphs of the above variables versus time.

Turn in the spreadsheet (we will discuss the results as a group in class)


#4: DLT (work with one partner on this project)

This project will provide you practice with using Vicon Motus to perform a DLT and check the accuracy of it.

  • Setup a survey pole calibration (This file will help you obtain coordinates).
  • Follow the steps you learned in class for filming and digitizing a calibration in Vicon Motus (make sure you sign up for the computer through http://calendar.google.com)
  • Film and digitize an object of known length within and without the calibrated area.
  • Answer the following questions:
    • How much did the actual length compare with the digitized coordinates?
    • What methods will you use to obtain the most accurate data when using Motus?

Turn in the responses to the questions and be prepared to discuss the answers in class.


#5: Running Mechanics (work alone on this project)

This project will provide you the opportunity to practice using the Vicon system and pull information related to the mechanics of running as velocity is increased.

  • Take any data you are interested in from Vicon after the data collection is performed in class.
  • Create a graph of some characteristic you measure and write up about 150 words discussing what you found.

Turn in the responses to the questions and be prepared to discuss your project in class.